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Wednesday, March 23

  1. page Historical.Influence.Pedagogy edited =Historical Historical Influence on Pedagogy= Pedagogy This paper from Educ 570 details my…

    =HistoricalHistorical Influence on Pedagogy=Pedagogy
    This paper from Educ 570 details my “personal professional theory” and is based not only on five years of teaching experience but on nearly 20 years experience as a student. It takes the lessons I learned from the most influential teachers of my childhood and demonstrates how they influence my teaching today. It details my origins as an Essentialist, concerned primarily with the content I taught, and shows how that began to change into a genuine concern for my students and their place in the classroom.
    I use the metaphor of a fish swimming upstream to describe the feeling of a teacher trying to overcome the force of government mandate and expectation to educate the next generation. When I first started teaching I felt like a conduit of “previously selected curriculum as opposed to one who was given the responsibility to develop and make professional decisions regarding curriculum based on the needs of his community and learners.” (Chant, 2009, p. 182) The current of pacing guides and state standards was too much for me, and I went with the flow.
    (view changes)
    8:23 pm
  2. page Historical.Influence.Pedagogy edited Historical =Historical Influence on Pedagogy Pedagogy= This paper from Educ 570 details my…

    Historical=Historical Influence on PedagogyPedagogy=
    This paper from Educ 570 details my “personal professional theory” and is based not only on five years of teaching experience but on nearly 20 years experience as a student. It takes the lessons I learned from the most influential teachers of my childhood and demonstrates how they influence my teaching today. It details my origins as an Essentialist, concerned primarily with the content I taught, and shows how that began to change into a genuine concern for my students and their place in the classroom.
    I use the metaphor of a fish swimming upstream to describe the feeling of a teacher trying to overcome the force of government mandate and expectation to educate the next generation. When I first started teaching I felt like a conduit of “previously selected curriculum as opposed to one who was given the responsibility to develop and make professional decisions regarding curriculum based on the needs of his community and learners.” (Chant, 2009, p. 182) The current of pacing guides and state standards was too much for me, and I went with the flow.
    (view changes)
    8:22 pm
  3. page Portfolio.Past edited ... {Ms.Castanon.jpg} My second year of middle school was a watershed moment. My assigned social s…
    ...
    {Ms.Castanon.jpg} My second year of middle school was a watershed moment. My assigned social studies teacher had suffered a debilitating accident and they had hired young, inexperienced teacher to replace him. She said, “I want you to call me Sandy.” And so we did. Sandy Castañon changed my life. She taught me that my ideas were important enough to gain the attention of an adult; that my creativity was strong enough to warrant writing down; that thoughts carried to a logical end were more powerful than facts. It didn’t hurt either that she was beautiful and that I crushed harder on her than almost any other time in my life.
    Sandy told me my creative ideas were good enough to be published, and I began writing in earnest. When I gave her chapters of my adventure stories to read, she did so not as a teacher but as a critic, in the best sense of that word. Her suggestions and observations taught me how to think critically about my writing and helped me to organize my thoughts. Today my creative writing and thinking are tempered with logic, and I am inspired to pass that gift on to my students.
    {Ms.Cochran2.jpg}
    High
    High school too
    The best example of this was the British Literature final project. While T.A.ing for her, I watched a class of 4th year students afflicted with major “senior-itis” dive into projects inspired by men and women from another continent that had been dead for centuries. The project had to be a creative interpretation based on one of the works they had studied that year. Some were inspired by Shakespeare, enacting scenes and parodies of Macbeth, while others worked with their hands to create a model of “The Prancing Pony” from Fellowship of the Ring or a paper maché Grendal, complete with removable arm. I still regret that I took AP English, and so was denied my own chance to videotape my project/opus “Beowulf Meets Godzilla”.
    These were oftentimes not the smartest students, yet Ms. Cochran’s differentiated teaching style reached each of them in a unique way. She was open experiment and take a chance on a method of learning she had not tried, but that held the hope of giving a struggling student the help they needed. It’s a goal I have failed to achieve up until now, with only a few small exceptions. Thinking back on her class, I wonder if Ms. Cochran would be disappointed in me; and I know that would only be the case if I failed to learn from that failure.
    (view changes)
    8:20 pm
  4. page Portfolio.Past edited ... {Ms.Castanon.jpg} My second year of middle school was a watershed moment. My assigned social s…
    ...
    {Ms.Castanon.jpg} My second year of middle school was a watershed moment. My assigned social studies teacher had suffered a debilitating accident and they had hired young, inexperienced teacher to replace him. She said, “I want you to call me Sandy.” And so we did. Sandy Castañon changed my life. She taught me that my ideas were important enough to gain the attention of an adult; that my creativity was strong enough to warrant writing down; that thoughts carried to a logical end were more powerful than facts. It didn’t hurt either that she was beautiful and that I crushed harder on her than almost any other time in my life.
    Sandy told me my creative ideas were good enough to be published, and I began writing in earnest. When I gave her chapters of my adventure stories to read, she did so not as a teacher but as a critic, in the best sense of that word. Her suggestions and observations taught me how to think critically about my writing and helped me to organize my thoughts. Today my creative writing and thinking are tempered with logic, and I am inspired to pass that gift on to my students.
    {Ms.Cochran2.jpg} High
    High
    school too
    ...
    of learning.
    The best example of this was the British Literature final project. While T.A.ing for her, I watched a class of 4th year students afflicted with major “senior-itis” dive into projects inspired by men and women from another continent that had been dead for centuries. The project had to be a creative interpretation based on one of the works they had studied that year. Some were inspired by Shakespeare, enacting scenes and parodies of Macbeth, while others worked with their hands to create a model of “The Prancing Pony” from Fellowship of the Ring or a paper maché Grendal, complete with removable arm. I still regret that I took AP English, and so was denied my own chance to videotape my project/opus “Beowulf Meets Godzilla”.
    These were oftentimes not the smartest students, yet Ms. Cochran’s differentiated teaching style reached each of them in a unique way. She was open experiment and take a chance on a method of learning she had not tried, but that held the hope of giving a struggling student the help they needed. It’s a goal I have failed to achieve up until now, with only a few small exceptions. Thinking back on her class, I wonder if Ms. Cochran would be disappointed in me; and I know that would only be the case if I failed to learn from that failure.
    (view changes)
    8:19 pm

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